HERBERT SMITH FREEHILLS – SMU ASIAN ARBITRATION LECTURE: “WITNESSES AND WEBCAMS: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF WITNESS EVIDENCE IN A VIRTUAL WORLD

It is with great pleasure that we invite you to the annual Herbert Smith Freehills-SMU Asian Arbitration Lecture on Tuesday, 23 November 2021, 5.00pm (Singapore time).

The Herbert Smith Freehills-SMU Asian Arbitration Lecture Series was established in 2010 and made possible by a term fund contribution by Herbert Smith Freehills. The objective of the Lecture Series is to promote collaborative forms of dispute resolution and access to justice, and in so doing to promote Singapore as the centre for dispute resolution in Asia, particularly in arbitration and mediation.

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SINGAPORE TO ALLOW CONDITIONAL FEE ARRANGEMENTS

On 1 November 2021, a bill to permit Conditional Fee Arrangements (CFA) had its first reading in the Singapore Parliament. If the bill is passed, it will permit law firms and lawyers in Singapore to enter into CFAs with their clients in respect of certain types of disputes (whether relating to proceedings in Singapore or any other foreign state), together with related advice and legal services, even if formal legal proceedings are not actually commenced.

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A TALE OF TWO BANIS – INDONESIAN SUPREME COURT’S LATEST RULING FINDS AGAINST THE CURRENT GOVERNING BOARD MEMBERS OF THE ORIGINAL BANI

Since 2016, the international community has followed the disputes involving BANI (Badan Arbitrase Nasional Indonesia), one of the oldest and most established arbitral institutions in Indonesia, and the more recently established BANI Pembaharuan (“BANI-P“). In fact, BANI-P’s establishment, registration and use of the “BANI” name led to the commencement of multiple lawsuits by members of the respective institutions and in February 2018, we reported on the status of those proceedings which were in various stages of appeals.

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SINGAPORE ARBITRATION UPDATE: A POTENTIAL CHANGE FOR ‘OPT-IN’ APPEALS FOR ERRORS OF LAW AND COURT CONFIRMATION OF THE CORRECT STANDARD TO BE MET TO RESTRAIN WINDING UP PROCEEDINGS WHERE A CLAIM IS SUBJECT TO ARBITRATION

Two recent developments in the Singapore arbitration landscape are of interest.  First, a written response from the Singapore Minister for Law confirms that the government is considering amending the International Arbitration Act (the “IAA”) to allow for appeals on errors of law on an opt-in basis. Second, a recent Singapore High Court decision confirms the standard to be met by a party seeking to restrain winding up proceedings when there is a valid arbitration agreement.  Underscoring both developments is a common objective of respecting party autonomy in arbitration.

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Singapore court refuses set aside on the basis that the successful party in the arbitration did not call witnesses to give evidence and disclose certain documents

In BVU v BVX [2019] SGHC 69 the High Court of Singapore refused to set-aside an arbitral award on the basis that BVX, the successful party in the arbitration, did not call certain witnesses to give evidence and disclose certain internal documents.  BVU’s attempt to secure these documents by way of subpoena in the context of the set-aside proceedings also failed.  The decision highlights that parties to an international arbitration are normally subject to less stringent requirements for the disclosure of documentary and other evidence.  The decision also emphasises that belated attempts to revisit the merits of a case by procuring additional evidence in the context of set-aside proceedings are unlikely to be successful.

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No U-Turns Ahead: Singapore Court of Appeal holds that commencement of court proceedings may lose you the right to later rely on arbitration agreements

In the recent landmark decision of Marty Ltd v Hualon Corp (Malaysia) Sdn Bhd [2018] SGCA 63, the Singapore Court of Appeal held that the commencement of court proceedings notwithstanding the existence of a binding arbitration agreement and without any explanation or qualification is in and of itself sufficient to constitute a prima facie repudiation of the arbitration agreement. Counterparties who have accepted the court’s jurisdiction would correspondingly be deemed to have accepted the repudiatory breach, and will also no longer be entitled to insist on adherence with the arbitration agreement.

The Singapore Court of Appeal’s decision is noteworthy as it departs from longstanding authority that the mere commencement of litigation proceedings would not constitute repudiation of the arbitration agreement. The Court also provides important guidance to parties to Singapore seated arbitrations on whether (and when) it is appropriate to commence litigation in circumstances where an arbitration agreement exists, and how to react if a counterparty does so.  We analyse the decision below.

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Be on time to preserve your right to Active Remedies – the Singapore High Court considers a party’s duty to apply promptly when challenging the jurisdiction of an arbitral tribunal

In Rakna Arakshaka Lanka Ltd (“RALL“) v Avant Garde Maritime Services (Private) Limited (“AGMS“) [2018] SGHC 78, the Singapore High Court dismissed an application to set aside an award on jurisdiction, on the basis that the applicant had failed to challenge the tribunal’s preliminary ruling on jurisdiction within the deadline stipulated under section 10(3) of the International Arbitration Act (“IAA“) and Article 16(3) of the UNCITRAL Model Law. The decision provides guidance on the distinction between active and passive remedies in the context of applicable deadlines when seeking to set aside an award on grounds of jurisdiction, and resisting enforcement on the same basis.

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Recent Developments in India-related International Arbitration

Herbert Smith Freehills has issued the latest edition of its Indian international arbitration e-bulletin.

In this issue we consider various court decisions, which cover issues such as the applicability of the Arbitration Amendment Act 2015, binding non-signatories to an award, enforcement of an award before the National Company Law Tribunal, and the continued pro-arbitration approach of the Indian courts. In other news, we consider the continued rise of institutional arbitration in India, a detailed analysis of the proposed amendments to the Arbitration Act, as well as India-related bilateral investment treaty news (and other developments).

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Inside Arbitration: Issue #6 of the publication from Herbert Smith Freehills’ Global Arbitration Practice

We are delighted to share with you the latest issue of the publication from the Herbert Smith Freehills Global Arbitration Practice, Inside Arbitration.

In addition to sharing knowledge and insight about the markets and industries in which our clients operate, the publication offers personal perspectives of our international arbitration partners from across the globe.

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Recent Developments in India-Related International Arbitration

Herbert Smith Freehills has issued the latest edition of its Indian international arbitration e-bulletin.

In this issue we consider various Indian court decisions, including the availability of interim relief in support of foreign arbitration, sanctions for non-compliance with arbitral orders and the pro-arbitration position adopted by the courts in upholding a foreign seat. In other news, we consider the rise of institutional arbitration in India and a detailed analysis of the Sri Krishna Committee report, developments in the Indian mediation landscape, proposed reforms for commercial courts, as well as India-related bilateral investment treaty news (and other developments). Continue reading