The discontinuation of LIBOR and arbitration: issues of substance and procedure for parties and arbitrators

The global financial markets are currently preparing for the phasing out of the London Inter-bank Offered Rate (or LIBOR) and other Inter-bank Offered Rates (or IBORs). LIBOR is the most widely used benchmark interest rate globally, employed in an estimated US$350 trillion worth of financial contracts worldwide. LIBOR may also be used in commercial contracts – for example, in price adjustment mechanisms in share purchase agreements, price escalation clauses or as a reference rate for contractual interest on late payments. LIBOR may also be specified in arbitration clauses as a benchmark rate for interest on the award.

Many financial instruments affected by the discontinuation of LIBOR will include arbitration clauses. As discussed below, whilst the substantive disputes arising from the end of LIBOR will be the same whether they are resolved in a court or by an arbitral tribunal, there are some additional considerations particular to the arbitration process which are relevant in the context of LIBOR discontinuation disputes. Further, even when determining a dispute which does not arise from the end of LIBOR, arbitral tribunals may have to grapple with how to award interest where an arbitration clause uses LIBOR as a reference point. Read more in the E-bulletin here.

Continue reading

ICC report on financial institutions and international arbitration: a condensed overview of a gradually changing landscape

This autumn, the ICC Commission on Arbitration and ADR published a report on Financial Institutions and International Arbitration (the "Report"). The Report offers a detailed analysis of the use of international arbitration in specialist sectors of the banking and finance industry, from derivatives and sovereign finance to advisory matters and asset management. The Report is based on interviews with over 50 financial institutions from across the globe, data received from 13 arbitration institutions and a review of relevant awards, internal policies and scholarly writing. Overall, the Report finds that despite a recent gradual shift towards more arbitration in the finance and banking industry, the use of arbitration by financial institutions remains limited. It concludes that this appears to be due to a lack of awareness of the benefits of international arbitration, combined with the traditional view that arbitration does not meet the needs of specialist financial disputes. In order to tackle these two findings, the Report seeks to give specific recommendations on how to tailor arbitration to the needs of the finance industry.

Continue reading