SPC ISSUES PROVISIONS ON ACTION PRESERVATION IN IP RIGHTS DISPUTES

The Supreme People’s Court of China (SPC) has released a new set of judicial interpretations concerning interim injunction applications for intellectual property rights (IP Rights)-related disputes. The Provisions on Application of Laws in Adjudication of Action Preservation Cases Involving Intellectual Property Disputes (Fa Shi [2018] No. 21) (Provisions) were published on 12 December 2018 and take effect on 1 January 2019. Prior to that, a consultation draft of the Provisions was released for public consultation on 26 February 2015.

The Provisions provide further guidance on interim injunctive relief (i.e. action preservation) applications made under Articles 100 and 101 of the Civil Procedure Law 2017 (2017 CPL) in cases concerning IP Rights and unfair competition, and clarify certain key concepts therein. (For more information on interim relief in the PRC, contact briana.young@hsf.com to request a copy of our guide “Interim Relief in Mainland China”.)

Some important articles in the Provisions, which are covered in this post, are:

  • Article 6, which provides for circumstances classified as “urgent circumstances” under Articles 100 and 101 of the 2017 CPL;
  • Article 7, which lists the factors that the courts shall take into consideration in determining whether an action preservation order should be granted;
  • Article 10, which elaborates on the concept of “irreparable harm” under Article 101 of the 2017 CPL in cases related to IP Rights or unfair competition. Risk of “irreparable harm” is an element that needs to be proved in any application for pre-litigation or pre-arbitration action preservation orders; and
  • Article 16, which specifies circumstances under which applications for action preservation will be considered “wrongful”.

Continue reading

SPC publishes new judicial interpretations on arbitration

The Supreme People’s Court of China (SPC) has released two judicial interpretations (Interpretations) on arbitration. The Interpretations were passed on 20 November 2017 and 4 December 2017. The texts of both were made public on 29 December 2017 and became effective on 1 January 2018. The Interpretations are the latest in a series of steps by the SPC to improve the regime for both domestic and cross-border arbitration in mainland China.

The Interpretations primarily address the judicial review of arbitration cases. The important provisions that have been given effect include:

  • Extending the existing “reporting system” to domestic arbitrations in order to achieve judicial consistency
  • Granting parties limited opportunities to participate in the reporting system to improve transparency
  • Encouraging parties to state expressly the law they intend to govern a foreign-related arbitration agreement
  • Clarifying that the decisions of the PRC Courts under the “reporting system” are not subject to appeal.

Continue reading

Supreme People’s Court Monitor update on judicial review of arbitration

The latest buzz within the Chinese international commercial legal community on Belt & Road related legal developments appears not to have surmounted the Great Wall of the Chinese language. The buzz is that a comprehensive judicial interpretation relating to arbitration is on route to promulgation.

On 4 December the Supreme People’s Court (SPC) issued a news release that its judicial committee had approved a judicial interpretation on judicial review of arbitration in principle, entitled Provisions on Some Issues Related to the Trial of the Judicial Review of Arbitration (Judicial Review of Arbitration Interpretation) (最高人民法院关于审理仲裁司法审查案件若干问题的规定).  “Approval in principle”  (原则通过) is not mentioned by the SPC’s 2007 regulations on judicial interpretations but is one of the SPC’s long-established practices.  It means that the judicial committee has approved it, subject to some “minor” amendments. Minor amendments are more than typographical errors and relate to specific substantive matters.  However, the news release did not specify what those “minor” issues were or set a deadline for issuing the interpretation. In December of last year (2016), the SPC’s judicial committee also approved in principle the #4 Company Law interpretation, but that interpretation was not formally issued until August of this year. This observer surmises (without any basis in facts or rumors) that the interpretation will be promulgated before Chinese new year so it can be one of the 2017 accomplishments of the SPC’s #4 Civil Division (but then again, that may be overly optimistic.

Continue reading

China proposes dedicated “Belt and Road” court

Supreme People’s Court Monitor has published a highly informative article on proposals by the SPC relating to China’s”Belt and Road” initiative. These include establishing a dedicated court, along the lines of the Singapore International Commercial Court, to hear Belt & Road disputes. Click here to read the piece.

Our thanks to Susan Finder of SPC Monitor for permission to re-publish.