Hong Kong funding law to take effect 1 February

Hong Kong has published its long-awaited Code of Practice for third party funders, and announced that amendments to the Arbitration Ordinance which permit funding of Hong Kong arbitrations will come fully into force on 1 February 2019. Similar amendments to the Mediation Ordinance (Cap. 620) have been deferred for further consultation.

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Be on time to preserve your right to Active Remedies – the Singapore High Court considers a party’s duty to apply promptly when challenging the jurisdiction of an arbitral tribunal

In Rakna Arakshaka Lanka Ltd (“RALL“) v Avant Garde Maritime Services (Private) Limited (“AGMS“) [2018] SGHC 78, the Singapore High Court dismissed an application to set aside an award on jurisdiction, on the basis that the applicant had failed to challenge the tribunal’s preliminary ruling on jurisdiction within the deadline stipulated under section 10(3) of the International Arbitration Act (“IAA“) and Article 16(3) of the UNCITRAL Model Law. The decision provides guidance on the distinction between active and passive remedies in the context of applicable deadlines when seeking to set aside an award on grounds of jurisdiction, and resisting enforcement on the same basis. Continue reading

Recent Developments in India-related International Arbitration

Herbert Smith Freehills has issued the latest edition of its Indian international arbitration e-bulletin.

In this issue we consider various court decisions, which cover issues such as the applicability of the Arbitration Amendment Act 2015, binding non-signatories to an award, enforcement of an award before the National Company Law Tribunal, and the continued pro-arbitration approach of the Indian courts. In other news, we consider the continued rise of institutional arbitration in India, a detailed analysis of the proposed amendments to the Arbitration Act, as well as India-related bilateral investment treaty news (and other developments). Continue reading

HONG KONG: UNLAWFUL DISMISSAL REINSTATEMENT RIGHTS FROM OCTOBER

Amendments to the Employment Ordinance (“EO“) which strengthen the Labour Tribunal’s (“LT“) powers to make an order for reinstatement or re-engagement where an employee has been unreasonably and unlawfully dismissed have been passed and are to take effect from 19 October 2018. This represents a move away from the current position where both the employer and employee must agree to reinstatement or re-engagement. We anticipate that applications for reinstatement will increase; including as a strategy by employees seeking to leverage greater settlement payments from employers unwilling to take them back.

Strengthening the power of the LT

Previously, the LT was only able to make an order for reinstatement or re-engagement with the consent of both the employer and the employee. From October, where the employee has been found to have been unreasonably and unlawfully dismissed under section 32A(1)(c) of the EO (“Unlawful Dismissal”), the LT can order reinstatement or re-engagement without the employer’s agreement. Unlawful Dismissal will occur where an employee is dismissed without a valid reason and one or more of the following is present:

  • the employee is pregnant or on statutory maternity leave;
  • the employee is on statutory sick leave or is suffering from a work-related illness or injury where an assessment of compensation due under the Employees’ Compensation Ordinance is pending;
  • the dismissal is due to the employee being a member or officer of a trade union or having engaged in lawful trade union activities; or
  • the dismissal is due to the employee having given or agreed to give evidence in relation to:
    • an alleged breach of the EO, the Factories and Industrial Undertakings Ordinance or any work safety obligations; or
    • a workplace accident.

In all other cases, an order for reinstatement or re-engagement will still require the consent of both parties.

Additional financial compensation and criminal liability

In the event the employer fails to comply with an order for reinstatement or re-engagement, they must pay compensation to the employee of the lesser of HK$72,500 or three times the employee’s average monthly wages.

If it later becomes no longer ‘reasonably practicable’ for an employer to re-instate or re-engage the individual, it can apply for relief against the payment of compensation provided that it can show that the circumstances making compliance ‘no longer reasonably practicable’ are ‘attributable to the employee’, or due to a ‘change in circumstances beyond the employer’s control’. This application for relief must be made within seven days from when the reinstatement or reengagement was to occur.

Non-compliance with an order for reinstatement or re-engagement is not itself an offence, however, if the employer then fails to pay the compensation due wilfully and without reasonable excuse, they will be guilty of a criminal offence and may be subject to fine of up to HK$350,000 and three years’ imprisonment.

Retrospective effect

The amendments to the EO will not have retrospective effect and will only apply to dismissals (or notice of dismissals) where the employee was informed of the dismissal after 19 October 2018.

Key takeaways

As noted above, the ability for the LT to order reinstatement without the consent of the parties is limited to Unlawful Dismissal cases. However, it may be that, where the relationship between the employer and employee has broken down, former employees may pursue applications for reinstatement as leverage in settlement discussions. Accordingly, to avoid increased risks of claims and the time and costs associated with responding to them, employers must take additional care when dismissing employees to ensure that they have a valid reason for doing so and the termination cannot be argue to be an Unlawful Dismissal.

Gareth Thomas
Gareth Thomas
Partner, Head of commercial litigation, Hong Kong
+852 2101 4025
Tess Lumsdaine
Tess Lumsdaine
Registered Foreign Lawyer (New South Wales)
+852 2101 4122

DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN ASIA-PACIFIC: PARTIES SEEK EFFICIENT PROCESSES AND ENFORCEABLE OUTCOMES

Following our report on the Global Pound Conference series, which brought together over 4000 stakeholders at 28 conferences worldwide, our analysis of the Asia Pacific results reveals different demands in Asia and Oceania.

Six Asia Pacific cities hosted conferences to assess how dispute resolution can be improved: Singapore; Hong Kong; Chandigarh, India; Bangkok, Thailand; Sydney, Australia and Auckland, New Zealand. Each conference addressed the demand side (commercial party perspectives on dispute resolution); the supply side (what advisers and providers are delivering to commercial parties); the key obstacles and challenges; and what needs to be addressed to effect change.

In Asia the data revealed a clear desire for enhanced regulation of mediation compared to Oceania. At first blush, this could be said to be rooted in civil versus common law traditions. But only one of the Asian countries to host a GPC event, Thailand, has a civil-law system. The reason appears to be more complex: enhanced regulation, particularly around enforcement, would lend credibility to mediation in Asia as a viable alternative to litigation or arbitration. This is particularly so in the context of commercial cross-border disputes. UNCITRAL’s proposed New York-style Convention on the mutual recognition and enforcement of mediation settlement agreements is likely to be applauded in Asia and may hail an inflection point for the use of mediation.

In Oceania, the results reveal more appetite amongst businesses for (a) front-loading in terms of protocols and clauses promoting ADR and (b) collaboration between parties and lawyers. This accords more with the data from other GPC conferences worldwide.

Region-wide, the data highlights that commercial parties want to use mediation and other ADR processes more, either alone or as an adjunct to adversarial proceedings. However, the data shows that the market is not responding adequately. As a result, mediation remains under-utilised, and actual use lags behind positive attitudes to it. Unless parties and their advisors actively take a different course (for example through inserting escalation clauses in contracts, actively proposing mediation at the point of dispute, or by following mandatory mediation protocols), there is likely to remain a perpetuation of the “same old processes” – litigation and arbitration.

Yet parties increasingly seek informal processes driven by commercial, cultural, and business needs that require a negotiated settlement. Layered upon this, technology is likely to assist in any transition from formal to informal dispute resolution processes. Unconstrained by rules of procedure, mediation is well-placed to capitalise on the greater adoption of technology in dispute resolution. Online Dispute Resolution has the capacity to fundamentally change how disputes are resolved in the future. The planned Asia Pacific ODR platform for B2B disputes will promote negotiation and mediation as pre-cursers to arbitration. In the long-tern, the development of an online region-wide platform may be highly important in reforming approaches to commercial dispute resolution in the region.

To read more about the Asia Pacific GPC results and what this means for your business, please see our article published in the American Bar Association’s Dispute Resolution Magazine Spring 2018 edition here.

 

Justin D'Agostino
Justin D'Agostino
Global Head of Practice, Dispute Resolution and Regional Managing Partner
+852 2101 4010
May Tai
May Tai
Greater China Managing Partner, Hong Kong
+852 2101 4031
Dominic Geiser
Dominic Geiser
Partner, Dispute Resolution Hong Kong
+852 2101 4629
Anita Phillips
Anita Phillips
Professional Support Consultant, Dispute Resolution Hong Kong
+852 2101 4184

Shaping the future of dispute resolution: global themes and regional differences revealed

The Global Pound Conference series – a unique and ambitious project to inform how commercial disputes should be resolved to better serve modern business – brought together over 4000 dispute resolution stakeholders, at 28 conferences in 24 countries worldwide.

Herbert Smith Freehills, global founding sponsor of the series, has teamed up with PwC and IMI (International Mediation Institute) to identify key insights from the voting data. With a focus on the needs of in-house counsel, this ground-breaking report challenges the traditional and fundamental notions of what clients want and how lawyers should represent them in a dispute. Continue reading

Podcast: How Arbitration and ADR can be used together

In this short podcast Professional Support Consultants Hannah Ambrose and Vanessa Naish look at how Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution (or “ADR”) can work together. The podcast considers how parties can agree to an ADR process in addition to, or alongside arbitration, looking at approaches in different jurisdictions and under different arbitral institutional rules, before turning to the complexities of drafting escalation clauses in contracts. Finally it looks at how a successful settlement should be formalised to be most effective and enforceable. Continue reading

2018 International Arbitration Survey – Enforcement of Arbitration Awards in the ASEAN region

This year marks the 60th anniversary of the Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards 1958, the “New York Convention”. Widely seen as one of the most successful international law treaties, the New York Convention was the foundation for the successful growth of arbitration as a preferred method for resolving international business disputes.

In connection with this significant milestone, Herbert Smith Freehills is conducting a survey on the enforcement of arbitration awards in the ASEAN region. We are keen to hear your views on how this enforcement regime has operated in practice in the ASEAN region, and how effective it is thought to be.

The survey will take less than 10 minutes to complete. Your participation will provide important information to support the research. All responses will be respected as private and confidential. The survey closes on 1 June 2018.

The results of this survey should be directly relevant and important to all businesses and enterprises that trade or invest into and across the ASEAN region. We will be glad to share the key findings and conclusions from the survey with all contributors.

Please follow this link to begin the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/92MKYPW.

Thank you very much for your support. 

 

Alastair Henderson
Alastair Henderson
Managing Partner, Southeast Asia
+65 6868 8058
 

Kritika Venugopal
Kritika Venugopal
Senior Associate, Singapore
+65 6868 8017