Recent Developments in India-related International Arbitration

Herbert Smith Freehills has issued the latest edition of its Indian international arbitration e-bulletin.

In this issue we consider various court decisions, which cover issues such as the applicability of the Arbitration Amendment Act 2015, binding non-signatories to an award, enforcement of an award before the National Company Law Tribunal, and the continued pro-arbitration approach of the Indian courts. In other news, we consider the continued rise of institutional arbitration in India, a detailed analysis of the proposed amendments to the Arbitration Act, as well as India-related bilateral investment treaty news (and other developments). Continue reading

New convention on the enforcement of mediation settlement agreements approved

On 26 June, at the 51st session of UNCITRAL, final drafts for a Convention on the Enforcement of Mediation Settlements and corresponding Model Law were approved. This paves the way for adoption by UNCITRAL’s Commission later this year. It is understood that the Convention will be called the Singapore Mediation Convention and will be signed at a ceremony in Singapore in 2019. The Convention must then be ratified by at least three member states to come into force.

Approval of the drafts represents the culmination of several years’ work by UNCITRAL Working Group II. Its aim has been to implement an international regime for the enforcement of mediated settlements broadly akin to the 1958 New York Convention for the enforcement of arbitral awards. This will increase the attraction of mediation for international parties, with all its well-known cost efficiencies and other potential benefits.

The initiative stems from a concern that the use of mediation to resolve international disputes has been impeded by the fact that, unless a  settlement reached via mediation is in the context of a pending arbitration and can be converted into an arbitral award,  parties can only enforce it in the same way as any other contract. In an international context, this can involve potentially difficult (and usually lengthy) processes to obtain a court judgment and then enforce it in a foreign jurisdiction.

Whilst problems of enforcement of mediated settlements have been sparse in practice (certainly compared to court judgments or arbitral awards), the Convention will no doubt add credibility to mediation as an international dispute resolution process. It will also make mediation particularly well suited to cross-border disputes.  At the Global Pound Conference series, delegates in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America all revealed a desire for legislation or conventions to promote the recognition and enforcement of settlements. This may reflect the varied and complex legal and political frameworks in these regions. Many of those surveyed manage businesses and disputes across several borders, where legal regimes can vary from stable, tested and familiar to those that are only a decade old. The call for regulation and certainty is even more critical as the pace of development intensifies through new trade treaties and investment, and massive initiatives such as the Belt and Road. The Convention and Model Law look set to respond well to this demand and may hail an inflection point for the use of mediation in these developing regions.

Materials approved on 26 June have not yet been made available on the relevant UNCITRAL webpage.  However they will in due course be posted on this page, which currently contains the most recent drafts (from February 2018) together with other details of the initiative.

DISPUTE RESOLUTION IN ASIA-PACIFIC: PARTIES SEEK EFFICIENT PROCESSES AND ENFORCEABLE OUTCOMES

Following our report on the Global Pound Conference series, which brought together over 4000 stakeholders at 28 conferences worldwide, our analysis of the Asia Pacific results reveals different demands in Asia and Oceania.

Six Asia Pacific cities hosted conferences to assess how dispute resolution can be improved: Singapore; Hong Kong; Chandigarh, India; Bangkok, Thailand; Sydney, Australia and Auckland, New Zealand. Each conference addressed the demand side (commercial party perspectives on dispute resolution); the supply side (what advisers and providers are delivering to commercial parties); the key obstacles and challenges; and what needs to be addressed to effect change.

In Asia the data revealed a clear desire for enhanced regulation of mediation compared to Oceania. At first blush, this could be said to be rooted in civil versus common law traditions. But only one of the Asian countries to host a GPC event, Thailand, has a civil-law system. The reason appears to be more complex: enhanced regulation, particularly around enforcement, would lend credibility to mediation in Asia as a viable alternative to litigation or arbitration. This is particularly so in the context of commercial cross-border disputes. UNCITRAL’s proposed New York-style Convention on the mutual recognition and enforcement of mediation settlement agreements is likely to be applauded in Asia and may hail an inflection point for the use of mediation.

In Oceania, the results reveal more appetite amongst businesses for (a) front-loading in terms of protocols and clauses promoting ADR and (b) collaboration between parties and lawyers. This accords more with the data from other GPC conferences worldwide.

Region-wide, the data highlights that commercial parties want to use mediation and other ADR processes more, either alone or as an adjunct to adversarial proceedings. However, the data shows that the market is not responding adequately. As a result, mediation remains under-utilised, and actual use lags behind positive attitudes to it. Unless parties and their advisors actively take a different course (for example through inserting escalation clauses in contracts, actively proposing mediation at the point of dispute, or by following mandatory mediation protocols), there is likely to remain a perpetuation of the “same old processes” – litigation and arbitration.

Yet parties increasingly seek informal processes driven by commercial, cultural, and business needs that require a negotiated settlement. Layered upon this, technology is likely to assist in any transition from formal to informal dispute resolution processes. Unconstrained by rules of procedure, mediation is well-placed to capitalise on the greater adoption of technology in dispute resolution. Online Dispute Resolution has the capacity to fundamentally change how disputes are resolved in the future. The planned Asia Pacific ODR platform for B2B disputes will promote negotiation and mediation as pre-cursers to arbitration. In the long-tern, the development of an online region-wide platform may be highly important in reforming approaches to commercial dispute resolution in the region.

To read more about the Asia Pacific GPC results and what this means for your business, please see our article published in the American Bar Association’s Dispute Resolution Magazine Spring 2018 edition here.

 

Justin D'Agostino
Justin D'Agostino
Global Head of Practice, Dispute Resolution and Regional Managing Partner
+852 2101 4010
May Tai
May Tai
Greater China Managing Partner, Hong Kong
+852 2101 4031
Dominic Geiser
Dominic Geiser
Partner, Dispute Resolution Hong Kong
+852 2101 4629
Anita Phillips
Anita Phillips
Professional Support Consultant, Dispute Resolution Hong Kong
+852 2101 4184

Shaping the future of dispute resolution: global themes and regional differences revealed

The Global Pound Conference series – a unique and ambitious project to inform how commercial disputes should be resolved to better serve modern business – brought together over 4000 dispute resolution stakeholders, at 28 conferences in 24 countries worldwide.

Herbert Smith Freehills, global founding sponsor of the series, has teamed up with PwC and IMI (International Mediation Institute) to identify key insights from the voting data. With a focus on the needs of in-house counsel, this ground-breaking report challenges the traditional and fundamental notions of what clients want and how lawyers should represent them in a dispute. Continue reading

Podcast: How Arbitration and ADR can be used together

In this short podcast Professional Support Consultants Hannah Ambrose and Vanessa Naish look at how Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution (or “ADR”) can work together. The podcast considers how parties can agree to an ADR process in addition to, or alongside arbitration, looking at approaches in different jurisdictions and under different arbitral institutional rules, before turning to the complexities of drafting escalation clauses in contracts. Finally it looks at how a successful settlement should be formalised to be most effective and enforceable. Continue reading

An international convention on the enforcement of mediated settlements – UNCITRAL moves one step closer

The UNCITRAL working group that has for several years now been considering the potential for an international enforcement regime for international mediation has now completed its work and produced draft instruments.

At its most recent meeting in New York, the UNCITRAL Working Group II (Dispute Settlement – formerly Arbitration and Conciliation) approved a draft convention and a draft amended Model Law on international settlement agreements resulting from mediation. Continue reading

The Global Pound Conference series and its importance

The Global Pound Conference (GPC) series presents a unique opportunity to engage all stakeholders in a conversation about dispute resolution and how it should best be used in commercial disputes. The time is ripe to review all processes (litigation, arbitration and the range of less formal processes like mediation). Anita Phillips, secretary of the Hong Kong Local Organising Committee and professional support consultant at Herbert Smith Freehills, and Julian Copeman, chair of the Hong Kong GPC Local Organising Committee and Greater China managing partner at Herbert Smith Freehills, discuss the GPC, what topics and discussions delegates can expect, and why it is so important to attend. Click here to watch the videos. 

To find out more about the Hong Kong event on 23 February and to register, click here

Asian Dispute Review promotes Hong Kong’s ground-breaking Global Pound Conference

Asian Dispute Review, sponsored by the Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre, Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, Hong Kong Institute of Arbitrators and the Hong Kong Mediation Council, has published an article on the Global Pound Conference Series, and what to expect from the Hong Kong event.

The one day Global Pound Conference is coming to the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre on 23 February and promises to be one of the major dispute resolution conferences of 2017. Delegates from across Hong Kong's dispute market will vote via GPC's voting App, and participate in real time debates by world class speakers.

Help us shape the future of dispute resolution in the territory.

The full programme is here.

Register here before 21 January and benefit from the excellent early bird rate of USD 150.

Herbert Smith Freehills is proud to be a founding sponsor of the Global Pound Conference Series and lead organiser of the Hong Kong event.

 

World Bank report endorses ADR and applauds the efficiency of the Singapore courts

As we look forward to convening in Singapore on 17/18 March at the inaugural Global Pound Conference, the World Bank Group's flagship report Doing Business 2016 has found Singapore to be the best jurisdiction worldwide on its quality of judicial processes index. The report cites Singapore as having the shortest time recorded worldwide for resolving a commercial dispute through the courts (at an average 150 days and a cost of 25.8% of claim value).   

Of course, the World Bank's figures regarding the efficiency of litigating in Singapore likely pale compared to the time and cost savings ADR offers businesses operating there. For information on ADR in Singapore, download our latest guide.

Globally, the World Bank found that the most common feature in reforming contract enforcement throughout the world in the past year was the implementation of ADR mechanisms. The  findings, based on data gathered across 189 economies, reinforce a 2014 EU-wide study suggesting that the average time taken to mediate a basic commercial dispute in the EU is 43 days, compared with 566 days – and an average 60% higher cost – of litigating it.

For information about the GPC conference in Singapore, and to register to attend, see our previous blog post here