41ST FA MANN LECTURE: THE RT HON DOMINIC GRIEVE QC MP SPEECH “BREXIT- ENDGAME OF INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT OR A NEW START?”

On 22 November the 41st FA Mann Lecture was delivered by the Rt Hon Dominic Grieve QC MP, speaking on the issue: “Brexit – endgame of international engagement or a new start?”  In the Lecture Mr Grieve observed that while “taking back control” may be a powerful idea in conditions where the decline in general confidence in institutions, both national and supranational, has become so marked, in an increasingly interdependent World, what constitutes the benefit of exclusive control becomes very hard to identify and therefore very hard to achieve without a high level of collateral consequences.  The full text of the Lecture delivered by Mr Grieve can now be found here.

The lecture was arranged by Herbert Smith Freehills LLP and the British Institute of International and Comparative Law.   It is the 41st in a series of annual lectures in honour of the late Dr FA Mann QC (Hon) (1907-1991), who was instrumental in the development of the law by the legislature, the courts, and legal scholarship, and a sought-after advisor to governments.

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Filed under Article 50, UK-EU negotiations

One Response to 41ST FA MANN LECTURE: THE RT HON DOMINIC GRIEVE QC MP SPEECH “BREXIT- ENDGAME OF INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT OR A NEW START?”

  1. David Schraa

    This is an important and very useful analysis. I am certain that litigators, commercial lawyers, and constitutional lawyers will spend many decades working out the full implications of the matters discussed here (in their final form, if in fact they are given one).

    The one point to be added is that, by focusing on a simplistic, romantic, but ahistorical concept of “sovereignty” (which might generously be called a naive and myopic version of Westphalian sovereignty), the Brexit project, in addition to creating all the problems discussed here, will as a practical matter reduce rather than enhance the UK’s actual sovereignty, in the sense of self-determination. Rather than being a leading participant in elaborating EU regulations and directives as it has been, the UK will inevitably, even if it crashes out, become a regulation taker, for a host of economic and business necessities will force that result. Moreover, the UK will be a regulation-taker not only from the EU but from the US, and possibly China, Russia and other sources (and constrained by the treaties and engagements detailed in the speech). As a diminished (but probably rather desperate) negotiating party, it will be forced to take much of what US lobbies, Chinese companies, or Russian oligarchs demand as the price of new trade relationships, which results will in many ways be the opposite of what most people thought they were voting for in Brexit.

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