Disinformation and ‘fake news’: Data implications of the Select Committee report

The revelations surrounding Cambridge Analytica’s use of personal data and involvement with the Vote Leave campaign raised serious questions about the use of personal data in the EU referendum campaign and more widely by technology companies in general.

The subsequent investigation by the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee (the “DCMS Select Committee“) has drawn attention to the activities of technology companies and the widespread use of digital personal data in political campaigning. It has been the catalyst for multiple investigations into a range of issues, including the extent to which electoral law is fit for purpose, the use of data analytics in political campaigns and policy recommendations concerning personal information and political influence.

The DCMS Select Committee published its final report (the “Report“) on 18 February 2019 (available here). Continue reading

Brexit, Data, Brexit

As we all continue to try to grapple with the implications of a no-deal Brexit, the last week or two has seen the publication of a few things of interest from a data protection perspective:

The EDPB’s view of data transfers in a no-deal Brexit scenario

On 12 February 2019, the European Data Protection Board (the “EDPB“) published a general information note on data transfers under the GDPR in the event of a no-deal Brexit (available here). In summary, the information note provides that organisations must comply with the GDPR when transferring personal data from the EU to the UK, which will become a “third country” for GDPR purposes (from 00.00 am CET on 30 March 2019). No new or additional safeguards are contemplated by the EDPB which effectively means that organisations must choose between:

  • Standard contractual clauses (which the EDPB acknowledges are “ready to use”);
  • Binding corporate rules;
  • Codes of conduct or certification mechanisms (although none are yet approved/available under the GDPR); or
  • Derogations such as individual explicit consent (although the EDPB emphasises that the derogations must be interpreted restrictively and mainly relate to processing activities that are occasional and non-repetitive).

For further information regarding the potential impact of a no-deal Brexit on data transfers, including an analysis of worked examples, please see our previous blog post available here.

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The German FCO/Facebook decision: implications for data privacy regulation

The German competition authority, the Federal Cartel Office (“FCO“) last week announced the results of its investigation into Facebook for a novel abuse of dominance involving consent for its data collection. Whilst the full decision is not yet public, the FCO has published a background paper here. In short, the FCO found that Facebook had a dominant position in the German market for social networks, and abused this with its data collection policy. The FCO did not impose a fine on Facebook, but has instead required Facebook in the future to only use data from non-Facebook sources where it has users’ voluntary consent, the withholding of which cannot be used to deny access to Facebook. Facebook has announced that it will appeal. Continue reading

Brexit and its impact on international transfers of personal data

Miriam Everett, Head of the Data Protection and Privacy group at Herbert Smith Freehills, has been working with the LexisNexis Data Protection Intelligence Group to publish a paper on Brexit and international personal data transfers: Practical approaches for the private sector in a time of uncertainty.

The paper explores how potential new international transfer restrictions (between the UK and EEA) may apply in a variety of worked examples and in the event of different Brexit outcomes. It also outlines, with practical examples, the steps that businesses may want to take to continue personal data transfers post-Brexit.

As we approach the exit date, organisations are having to critically assess international data transfers and evaluate how to legitimise such transfers in a post-Brexit world. This paper is the first of its kind (as far as the group is aware) to give detailed worked examples of how available compliance solutions could be applied to both GDPR and UK GDPR regulation.

Click here to read the full paper.

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