UK: unionised employers can make direct offer of new terms to workers provided the collective bargaining process has been exhausted

The Supreme Court has ruled that a unionised employer’s direct offer of new terms to workers will not be an unlawful inducement to opt out of collective bargaining, provided the collective bargaining process has been exhausted. In Kostal UK Ltd v Dunkley the employer made two separate offers directly to workers after its offer had been … Read more

Employment Espresso Pods: Return to work: Jabs, Tests & Psychedelic Zebras

We are delighted to launch a new podcast series: “Employment Espresso Pods” Join Herbert Smith Freehills’ Employment team for a coffee catch up as they discuss current hot topics impacting the employment sphere. In this, first episode, the team looks at returning to work in the UK following the Covid-19 pandemic. They tackle issues including … Read more

UK: failure to take action can amount to breach of trust and confidence

The decision in Nair v Lagardère Sports And Entertainment UK confirms that an employer’s failure to take action can amount to a breach of the implied duty of trust and confidence in the same way as a positive action. In this case the employer had engaged in a prolonged course of prevaricating and stringing along … Read more

UK: High Court rulings on duty of care to protect against economic loss

In Rihan v Ernst & Young (Global) Ltd, the High Court awarded a former partner of Ernst & Young (EY) damages exceeding $11 million, broadly equating to past and future earnings for the rest of his career. The claimant, Mr Rihan, was a whistleblower who publicly disclosed suspected irregularities arising out of an audit for … Read more

UK: employment law changes April 2020

The following changes came into force in April: From 6 April 2020 employees are entitled to two weeks’ statutory parental bereavement leave following the death of a child under 18 or a stillbirth after 24 weeks of pregnancy.  There is also a right to statutory pay for those with 26 weeks’ service.  Employers will need … Read more

UK: covert recording by employee may not be gross misconduct

The Employment Appeal Tribunal has ruled that covert recording by an employee will not always be a breach of the implied duty of trust and confidence. It will normally amount to misconduct, but will not automatically be gross misconduct justifying dismissal. Relevant factors will include the purpose of the recording, which “may vary widely from … Read more