Hong Kong Monetary Authority announces LIBOR transition milestones and provides guidance on prudential issues

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) has issued a circular to announce the key milestones that authorised institutions (AIs) should endeavour to achieve in the transition from LIBOR to alternative reference rates (ARRs).

This follows a statement by the Financial Stability Board (FSB) on 1 July 2020 in which it maintained its long-held view that “firms across all jurisdictions should continue their efforts in making wider use of risk-free rates in order to reduce reliance on IBORs where appropriate and in particular to remove remaining dependencies on LIBOR by the end of 2021”, notwithstanding the Covid-19 outbreak.

As advised by the HKMA, AIs should implement a detailed work plan (by product and by business line) to achieve the milestones. If they anticipate difficulties in achieving the milestones, they should reach out to the HKMA as soon as possible.

This e-bulletin provides an overview of the milestones, as well as recent developments in Hong Kong and internationally. Among other things, the HKMA issued a circular on 23 July 2020 to provide guidance to AIs on the frequently asked questions published by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) on prudential issues relating to the benchmark reform. Continue reading

Bridging the FinTech gap: What dividend should we seek from regulatory cooperation across jurisdictions?

Technology-facilitated innovation in financial services, a diverse collection of topics which coalesces under the portmanteau term of “FinTech”, is increasingly in the sights of policy-makers, whether at global, regional and national or state levels.  Keen observers will have noted a proliferation of consultation documents, statements, warnings, speeches and more emanating from national regulators.  Some of these recent publications address specific FinTech applications. Indeed, there has been a veritable deluge of material on Initial Coin Offerings over just the past few months.

Meanwhile bodies such as the Financial Stability Board (FSB), the influential Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS), and others, both within and without the traditional regulatory cohort, are making some efforts towards setting out (or attempt to setting out) some universal principles or truths which may address an increasingly gaping hole in the global regulatory policy canon.

We are at an early stage in the development of policy responses to FinTech, and it is perhaps unsurprising that globally agreed standards have yet to emerge.

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