Australia: Final Report of the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry released

The Final Report of the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry (Hayne Report) was released to the public on 4 February 2019. The Federal Government has agreed to take action on all 76 recommendations contained in the Hayne Report, and in a number of areas has indicated it intends to go further, including conducting an immediate review of financial counselling services.  Herbert Smith Freehills have prepared a briefing paper which identifies the following key themes and reforms contained within the Hayne Report:

  1. Governance overhaul – Boards will need to exercise greater scrutiny over their governance systems, policies and procedures;
  2. Conflicts – a number of the changes proposed are designed to alter the objective from one of ‘managing’ to one of ‘eliminating’ conflicts of interest;
  3. Individual accountability – the proposed changes to remuneration and accountability regimes are significant, with individuals to be held to account more than ever before for the adequacy of complex systems, policies and procedures;
  4. Principles not prescription – the Hayne Report observes that prescriptive laws which are vast and complex may be less effective than statements of broad matters of principle, suggesting that now may be an apt time to revisit the current approach to regulation of the provision of financial services within Australia;
  5. Enforcement revolution – above all, the Hayne Report recommends greater personal accountability coupled with stronger regulators with an incentive to investigate and hold wrongdoers to account, making for an ‘enforcement revolution’. Organisations which do not proactively seek to identify and address inadequacies in their systems will likely find themselves redirecting resources toward activities which will do little to enhance their reputations or shareholder wealth.

The briefing paper considers in detail the key changes recommended in the Hayne Report and what these changes will mean for businesses and the Australian financial services landscape.

HKMA publishes open API framework for Hong Kong banking sector and launches own open API

On 18 July 2018, the HKMA announced that it had concluded a consultation on its intended approach to open application programming interface (API) for the Hong Kong banking sector, and had published its final framework and implementation plan.

The open API is one of seven initiatives announced by the HKMA in September 2017 to bring Hong Kong into a “new era of smart banking”. Brief details of the consultation can be found in our briefing of February 2018.

The framework focuses at this stage on retail banking, but banks are welcome to extend the framework to other banking businesses as they consider appropriate. Please click here to read more.

 

William Hallatt
William Hallatt
Head of Financial Services Regulatory, Asia
+852 2101 4036
Hannah Cassidy
Hannah Cassidy
Partner, Hong Kong
+852 2101 4133
Valerie Tao
Valerie Tao
Professional Support Lawyer, Hong Kong
+852 2101 4125

A NEW GLOBAL TOOLKIT FOR FIGHTING MISCONDUCT RISK: WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR FIRMS AND REGULATORS?

On 20 April 2018, the Financial Stability Board (FSB) released its long awaited toolkit (Toolkit) for firms and regulators’ use in fighting misconduct risk. The Toolkit forms part of the FSB’s workplan to mitigate misconduct risk, and builds on existing measures such as the FSB’s guidance on sound compensation practicesContinue reading