Herbert Smith Freehills’ global Trade Marks Practice lauded a ‘formidable force’ in WTR 1000 rankings

Herbert Smith Freehills has been lauded a ‘class act’, after it was ranked highly in the 2019 edition of World Trademark Review (WTR) 1000.

Now in its ninth year, the WTR 1000 highlights firms and individuals that are deemed outstanding in this area of practice.

Herbert Smith Freehills has been showcased in the research directory as being ‘a formidable force within the trademark sphere’ and a ‘prestigious commercial outfit’, after it was highlighted for having particularly strong trademark experience globally in WTR 1000. The firm’s practices in the UK, Australia, France and Italy were all highly ranked in the directory.

The publication singles out the firm for being “packed to the rafters with world-class talent that consistently exceeds the expectations of clients”.

WTR cites the “hands-on leadership” of Joel Smith, UK Head of IP as crucial to the side’s recent growth and success and goes on to highlight Joel as “a brilliant strategic thinker” flagging his work for major brands alongside much-praised Paris Partner Alexandra Neri on cross-border trade mark disputes.

Global Head of IP Mark Shillito is lauded as an “exquisite complex problem solver and litigator” and Laura Orlando has also been showcased, after she helped set up our growing Milan office in late 2017. She is flagged for her, “super pragmatic and business oriented” approach, which makes her one of the “best IP lawyers in Italy”.

Celia Davies, who heads Herbert Smith Freehills’ Trademarks prosecution group in Australia, is “a true leader in the trademark market”. Melbourne Partner Shaun McVicar has also been held up as possessing a “commercial and strategic outlook on litigation” which means that brands are in “good hands when he is on a case.” Partner Sue Gilchrist is also singled out as being a “top-flight litigator” and Kristin Stammer as an “eminent adviser with terrific technical trademark knowledge”.

In its write-up of the firm’s trade mark practice, WTR comments, “Herbert Smith Freehills isn’t about being the biggest in trademarks; it focuses, instead, on quality and adding strategic value for blue-chip international rights holders – and routinely surpasses expectations in both regards.”

As with previous editions, to arrive at the 2019 rankings, WTR undertook an exhaustive qualitative research project to identify the firms and individuals that are deemed outstanding in this critical area of practice. The publication says that when identifying the leading firms, factors such as depth of expertise, market presence and the level of work on which they are typically instructed were all taken into account, alongside positive peer and client feedback.

To view the full write-up, please visit: https://www.worldtrademarkreview.com/directories/wtr1000

Advocate General proposes literal interpretation of Article 3(d) SPC Regulation in Abraxis (C-443/17)

The Advocate General of the CJEU proposed a narrow interpretation of Article    3(d) in the Opinion given yesterday in Abraxis Bioscience LLC v Comptroller General of Patents 13 December 2018, one that would marginalise the effect of the CJEU’s decision in Neurim (C-130/11). If followed by the CJEU, this position would be met with disappointment by the pharmaceutical industry, which continues to make significant investments in researching and developing formulations that improve efficacy and new uses of known products.

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Patent and Pharma Update – December 2018

Key recent developments in the United Kingdom and Europe relating to patents and the pharmaceutical sector

This issue reports on several ground-breaking decisions from the UK courts on second medical use patents and skinny labels, infringement by equivalents and the possibility of global FRAND licences for standard essential patents (SEPs).  We also look at some significant decisions from the CJEU on SPCs and reimbursements in relation to medicinal products and a few developments at the European Patent Office. Finally, we provide our usual round-up of the latest UPC developments (this time from Italy) and Brexit-related developments relevant to the pharma sector. Continue reading

CJEU rules on whether the NHS reimbursing off-label medicinal products for cost-cutting purposes conflicts with Directive 2001/83/EC

Novartis Farma S.p.A. v Italian Medicines Agency and Roche Italia S.p.A.

On 21 November 2018, the CJEU issued an important decision in Novartis Farma v Italian Medicines Agency and Roche Italia et al. (C-29/17). The case was referred to the CJEU by the Italian Council of State and regarded an Italian law that allows the national healthcare insurance system (NHS) to reimburse a medicinal product for a use not covered by its marketing authorisation (off-label use) in order to reduce expenditure, notwithstanding the existence and market availability of a valid therapeutic alternative.

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UK Government launches consultation on role of MHRA post-Brexit and confirms commitment to underwrite Horizon 2020 funding

The UK Government has today launched a consultation on the role of the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) post-Brexitseeking views on how the MHRA legislation and regulatory processes would have to be modified in the event of the UK not securing a deal with the EU after the UK’s exit, with no Implementation Period“. As the consultation closes at 11.45 pm on 1 November 2018, time is short for making a response.

Also today, the Government has released an overview of the UK’s relationship with the EU’s Horizon 2020 science and innovation funding programme including a link to the portal where those with current funding can submit data which will be used to guarantee funding post-Brexit.

MHRA Consultation

  • This consultation was promised in the no-deal technical notice on medicines, clinical trials and medical devices, discussed in our blog post of 29 August 2018. It is expressed to be set in the context of “the UK not securing a deal with the EU after the UK’s exit, with no Implementation Period“, i.e. a “cliff edge” no-deal scenario, with no transitional period. However, if the EU Withdrawal Agreement (which sets out the terms on which the UK leaves the EU and is currently being negotiated between the UK and the Commission) is concluded on the terms that have so far been declared as agreed between the negotiators, then there would be a period until the end of 2020 when the UK would still effectively be part of the EU, despite technically having exited at 11pm on 29 March 2019.
  • A direct link to the consultation can be found here.  More detail on the consultation, including the specific areas being covered, can be found in the Consultation Introduction. As the introduction to states, “the overall approach in no-deal is for the MHRA to be a stand-alone medicines and medical devices regulator, taking any decisions and carrying out any functions which are currently taken or carried out at EU-level. This would include decisions on Marketing Authorisation (MA) applications which are currently authorised through the Centralised Procedure, paediatric investigation plans and orphan status, as well as pharmacovigilance responsibilities“. The consultation also asks for comments on clinical trials issues.
  • The introduction recommends that you read the Draft Statutory Instrument (SI) text, Impact Assessment and Consultation Annex before responding. The Draft SI text relates to statutory instruments that will be needed to update the Human Medicines Regulations 2012, the Medicines for Human Use (Clinical Trials) Regulations 2004, the Medicines (Products for Human Use) (Fees) Regulations 2016, and the Medical Devices Regulations 2002.
  • Response to the consultation is in the form of an on-line survey. Each section of the survey is optional, so you can limit your response to the sections you are interested in.

Horizon 2020 funding

  • Following on from the no-deal technical notice on Horizon 2020 funding which was issued with the other life sciences related notices in August (here), the UK Government has published an overview of the UK’s relationship with Horizon 2020, followed by a Q&A, which aims to clarify the UK’s eligibility to participate in Horizon 2020 – here. Current UK recipients of Horizon 2020 funding are invited to provide data about their projects on a portal managed by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) (linked on the same page), so that the UKRI has the information it needs in order to underwrite the guaranteed payments if this becomes necessary.
  • As we previously stated in our blog post: If there is ‘no deal’, the Government says it has taken steps to provide continued support for research and innovation currently being funded through this EU project fund. The Government will guarantee funding in most cases, for the full duration of the project, where the funding relates to successful bids submitted by UK participants before the UK exits the EU. Funding will only be for UK participants however. Where UK participants are leading consortia of non-UK parties and would normally be distributing the Horizon 2020 funds, the Government will seek to discuss with the EU Commission how best to address this. In it’s no-deal notice, the Government said it was considering what other measures may be necessary to support UK research and innovation in the event that the EU’s funding is no longer available. Looking beyond 2020, the notice said that “the UK remains committed to ongoing collaboration in research and innovation and wants to work with the EU on a mutually beneficial outcome“.

Contacts

Jonathan Turnbull
Jonathan Turnbull
Partner
+44 20 7466 2174
Rachel Montagnon
Rachel Montagnon
Professional Support Consultant, London
+44 20 7466 2217

Brexit “no deal” technical notices published on Patents, Trade marks, Designs, Copyright, GIs, and Exhaustion of rights

The latest tranche of “no deal” technical notices was released yesterday afternoon by the UK Government. Amongst them are several notices that highlight the Brexit issues faced by intellectual property right owners and, in some cases, confirm the Government’s approach to resolving them. The Government also released this news story today which comments on the guidance given in the technical notices and comments on the Government’s longer term aims for IP protection.

Key announcements, in the context of no deal, are:

  • Provision of a new right to replace unregistered Community design rights, to be known as “the supplementary unregistered design right“.
  • Existing EUTMs and Community registered designs will be replaced with new, equivalent rights in the UK at the end of the implementation/transition period, “with minimal administrative burden“.
  • The SPC, compulsory licensing, pharmaceutical product testing exception and patenting of biotechnological inventions regimes will remain unchanged at least initially.
  • If the UPC comes into force the UK will replace unitary patent rights with equivalent rights if the UK needs to withdraw from the new system, although the UK “will explore whether it is possible to remain within it“. The Government’s news story states that “The UK intends to stay in the Unified Patent Court and unitary patent system after we leave the EU.”
  • UK originating sui generis database rights will no longer be enforceable in the EEA; “UK owners may want to consider relying on other forms of protection (e.g. restrictive licensing agreements or copyright where applicable) for their databases
  • The UK will set up its own GI schemewhich will be WTO TRIPS compliant“. The new rights “will broadly mirror the EU regime and be no more burdensome to producers“.  Since the UK would no longer be required to recognise EU GI status, EU producers would be able to apply for UK GI status. Those wishing to protect UK GIs in the EU will need to submit applications on a third country basis.
  • The UK will continue to accept the exhaustion of IP rights in products put on the market in the EEA by, or with the consent of, the rights holder. However, the EU will likely not consider that goods placed on the UK market are exhausted in the EEA, and thus permission may need to be sought from the rights holder to transfer goods to the EEA that have legitimately been put on the market in the UK. The Government news story says that “The UK looks forward to exploring arrangements on IP cooperation that will provide mutual benefits to UK and EU rights holders and we are ready to discuss issues the EU wishes to raise in the negotiations on our future relationship, including exhaustion of IP rights”.

Links to the notices:

  1. Patents
  2. Trade marks and designs
  3. Copyright
  4. Geographical Indications
  5. Exhaustion of IP rights

More detail on each of these is provided below. For those with an interest in Life Sciences please also see our blog post on the notices related to that sector that were released last month.

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Brexit “No Deal” Technical Notices – lots for the life sciences sector to think about

The UK Government issued the first batch of its Brexit “No Deal” Technical Notices on 23 August 2018. These are designed to provide guidance to businesses and other interested parties on how to deal with the problems that a “no deal” scenario will throw up i.e. if the UK exits the EU at the end of March 2019 with no transitional arrangements in place.

There were 25 notices released in this initial batch (see Herbert Smith Freehills’ general commentary here). Over 50 further technical notices are expected to be published before the end of September.

Of the first notices issues, those that will be of particular interest to life sciences businesses include:

More detail on each of these is provided below. Continue reading

HSF Legal Guide to Brexit – an update on provision for intellectual property rights

IP rights which are designated as applying across the EU (EU trade marks, Community plant variety rights, Community registered designs and Community unregistered designs) and those, qualification for which involves activity within the EU (such as database rights), are all at risk of termination in relation to the territory of the UK once the definition ‘EU’ no longer includes the UK. However, the Commission and the UK Government have agreed at negotiator level (as published on 19 March 2018 and subsequently, 19 June 2018) certain sections in the withdrawal agreement including provision of replacement rights for those registered rights thus affected and for the UK Government to provide replacement rights for UK registered rights.

The UK Government’s White Paper detailing its proposal for the future relationship between the UK and the EU (published on 12 July 2018) includes a limited number of proposals relating to intellectual property as follows:

• The UK intends to explore staying in the Unified Patent Court (UPC) and Unitary Patent system post-Brexit. The UK will work with the member states that have signed up to the UPC Agreement to ensure that the UPC Agreement can continue on a firm legal basis;

• Arrangements on future co-operation on intellectual property are recognised as important to provide confidence and security to rights holders operating in and between the UK and the EU;

• The UK will establish its own Geographical Indications (GIs) scheme to provide continuous protection for UK GIs in the UK and protection for new GIs applied for by UK and non-UK applicants

In our detailed briefing, we review the proposals for the treatment and protection of intellectual property rights in the UK at Brexit: see Intellectual Property and Brexit (part of the HSF Brexit Legal Guide 2018).

See also the Herbert Smith Freehills Brexit Hub and Brexit Blog.

Authors

Rachel Montagnon
Rachel Montagnon
Professional Support Consultant, London
+44 20 7466 2217

Intellectual Property and Cyber Security issues considered in UK Government White Paper on the future UK-EU relationship

The UK Government’s White Paper detailing its proposal for the future relationship between the UK and the EU (published on 12 July 2018) includes a limited number of proposals relating to intellectual property and cyber security as follows:

  • The UK intends to explore staying in the Unified Patent Court (UPC) and Unitary Patent system post-Brexit. The UK will work with the member states that have signed up to the UPC Agreement to ensure that the UPC Agreement can continue on a firm legal basis;
  • Arrangements on future co-operation on intellectual property are recognised as important to provide confidence and security to rights holders operating in and between the UK and the EU;
  • The UK and EU will need to continue to co-operate on cyber security to counter cyber threats;
  • The UK will establish its own Geographical Indications (GIs) scheme to provide continuous protection for UK GIs in the UK and protection for new GIs applied for by UK and non-UK applicants

UPC and Unitary Patent

Opinions vary on the likelihood of whether the UK could continue as part of the UPC and Unitary patent system post-Brexit. The Foreword to the White Paper by the Prime Minister states that the proposals in the White Paper would end the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice in the UK. It is not clear whether the UK would nevertheless accept the role of the European Court of Justice in respect of references from the UPC on matters of European law.

Future Co-operation on intellectual property

The draft withdrawal agreement of 19 March 2018 (as supplemented by the joint statement on 19 June 2018) sets out the text (highlighted in green in the draft) agreed between the Commission and UK at negotiator level, in relation to the replacement of EU-wide rights with equivalent UK rights, which may indicate that there will be substantive future co-operation.

Cyber Security

It is proposed that here will be close collaboration between the UK and the Network and Information Security (NIS) Cooperation Group, Computer Security Incident Response Team (CSIRT) Network (created under the NIS directive) and the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA). While the UK’s desire to remain involved in the EU cyber security apparatus is welcome, no details of the legal mechanisms by which this will be achieved are provided at this stage.

Geographic Indications

The provisions in the draft withdrawal agreement relating to GIs have not yet been agreed at negotiator level. However, the White Paper states that the UK wants equivalence arrangements on a broad range of food policy rules, including GIs, noting that GIs provide legal protection against imitation and misrepresentations about quality or geographical origin for agri-food products that have a strong traditional or cultural connection to a particular geographical area. The UK will establish its own GI scheme consistent with (and going beyond) the provisions of the WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPS). The new scheme is to provide a clear and simple set of rules on GIs and continuous protection in the UK for UK GIs notwithstanding exit from the EU. The scheme will be open to new applications from both UK and non-UK applicants.

For further analysis of the impact of Brexit on IP rights and how to moderate this, see the IP section of the HSF Brexit Legal Guide in the Brexit hub of our website (https://www.herbertsmithfreehills.com/latest-thinking/hubs/brexit).

Authors

Mark Shillito
Mark Shillito
Partner
+44 20 7466 2031
Laura Deacon
Laura Deacon
Of Counsel
+44 20 7466 2045
Peter FitzPatrick
Peter FitzPatrick
Associate
+44 20 7466 3711

Herbert Smith Freehills wins IP Team of the Year at the Lawyer Awards

Herbert Smith Freehills has been named IP Team of the Year at The Lawyer Awards 2017, for its work defending one of the largest-ever patent cases to be heard in the UK High Court.

Earlier this month, Herbert Smith Freehills was also awarded Transatlantic IP Team of the Year at the American Lawyer Awards 2017, for the team's successful work on Gilead (and was also named Litigation Team of the Year for work on the disputes surrounding the collapse of the Nortel Networks group).

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