Preparations for the UPC continue despite an “unpredictable environment”

The UPC Preparatory Committee has issued a “Status of the Unified Patent Court Project” statement and review of 2018, confirming that there are now 16 states which have ratified the UPC, and that German ratification is still awaited (dependent on the outcome of the complaint pending before the Constitutional Court in Germany) before the project can move into provisional application phase. This latter phase is allows the courts to be prepared and judges to be appointed.

 

Despite the current, somewhat unpredictable environment, the technical and operational preparations are continuing allowing for the project to move at pace in the event of a positive outcome from the German Constitutional Court“.

The press release says nothing more than was already known, but it does confirm that the status of the project is constantly being reviewed, stating that the Chairman of the UPC Preparatory Committee “continues to meet with the Executive Group and the operational team on a monthly basis” and noting that those that have applied for judicial positions in the Unified Patent Court are being contacted separately.

Author

Rachel Montagnon
Rachel Montagnon
Professional Support Consultant, London
+44 20 7466 2217

Brexit “no deal” technical notices published on Patents, Trade marks, Designs, Copyright, GIs, and Exhaustion of rights

The latest tranche of “no deal” technical notices was released yesterday afternoon by the UK Government. Amongst them are several notices that highlight the Brexit issues faced by intellectual property right owners and, in some cases, confirm the Government’s approach to resolving them. The Government also released this news story today which comments on the guidance given in the technical notices and comments on the Government’s longer term aims for IP protection.

Key announcements, in the context of no deal, are:

  • Provision of a new right to replace unregistered Community design rights, to be known as “the supplementary unregistered design right“.
  • Existing EUTMs and Community registered designs will be replaced with new, equivalent rights in the UK at the end of the implementation/transition period, “with minimal administrative burden“.
  • The SPC, compulsory licensing, pharmaceutical product testing exception and patenting of biotechnological inventions regimes will remain unchanged at least initially.
  • If the UPC comes into force the UK will replace unitary patent rights with equivalent rights if the UK needs to withdraw from the new system, although the UK “will explore whether it is possible to remain within it“. The Government’s news story states that “The UK intends to stay in the Unified Patent Court and unitary patent system after we leave the EU.”
  • UK originating sui generis database rights will no longer be enforceable in the EEA; “UK owners may want to consider relying on other forms of protection (e.g. restrictive licensing agreements or copyright where applicable) for their databases
  • The UK will set up its own GI schemewhich will be WTO TRIPS compliant“. The new rights “will broadly mirror the EU regime and be no more burdensome to producers“.  Since the UK would no longer be required to recognise EU GI status, EU producers would be able to apply for UK GI status. Those wishing to protect UK GIs in the EU will need to submit applications on a third country basis.
  • The UK will continue to accept the exhaustion of IP rights in products put on the market in the EEA by, or with the consent of, the rights holder. However, the EU will likely not consider that goods placed on the UK market are exhausted in the EEA, and thus permission may need to be sought from the rights holder to transfer goods to the EEA that have legitimately been put on the market in the UK. The Government news story says that “The UK looks forward to exploring arrangements on IP cooperation that will provide mutual benefits to UK and EU rights holders and we are ready to discuss issues the EU wishes to raise in the negotiations on our future relationship, including exhaustion of IP rights”.

Links to the notices:

  1. Patents
  2. Trade marks and designs
  3. Copyright
  4. Geographical Indications
  5. Exhaustion of IP rights

More detail on each of these is provided below. For those with an interest in Life Sciences please also see our blog post on the notices related to that sector that were released last month.

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Intellectual Property and Cyber Security issues considered in UK Government White Paper on the future UK-EU relationship

The UK Government’s White Paper detailing its proposal for the future relationship between the UK and the EU (published on 12 July 2018) includes a limited number of proposals relating to intellectual property and cyber security as follows:

  • The UK intends to explore staying in the Unified Patent Court (UPC) and Unitary Patent system post-Brexit. The UK will work with the member states that have signed up to the UPC Agreement to ensure that the UPC Agreement can continue on a firm legal basis;
  • Arrangements on future co-operation on intellectual property are recognised as important to provide confidence and security to rights holders operating in and between the UK and the EU;
  • The UK and EU will need to continue to co-operate on cyber security to counter cyber threats;
  • The UK will establish its own Geographical Indications (GIs) scheme to provide continuous protection for UK GIs in the UK and protection for new GIs applied for by UK and non-UK applicants

UPC and Unitary Patent

Opinions vary on the likelihood of whether the UK could continue as part of the UPC and Unitary patent system post-Brexit. The Foreword to the White Paper by the Prime Minister states that the proposals in the White Paper would end the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice in the UK. It is not clear whether the UK would nevertheless accept the role of the European Court of Justice in respect of references from the UPC on matters of European law.

Future Co-operation on intellectual property

The draft withdrawal agreement of 19 March 2018 (as supplemented by the joint statement on 19 June 2018) sets out the text (highlighted in green in the draft) agreed between the Commission and UK at negotiator level, in relation to the replacement of EU-wide rights with equivalent UK rights, which may indicate that there will be substantive future co-operation.

Cyber Security

It is proposed that here will be close collaboration between the UK and the Network and Information Security (NIS) Cooperation Group, Computer Security Incident Response Team (CSIRT) Network (created under the NIS directive) and the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA). While the UK’s desire to remain involved in the EU cyber security apparatus is welcome, no details of the legal mechanisms by which this will be achieved are provided at this stage.

Geographic Indications

The provisions in the draft withdrawal agreement relating to GIs have not yet been agreed at negotiator level. However, the White Paper states that the UK wants equivalence arrangements on a broad range of food policy rules, including GIs, noting that GIs provide legal protection against imitation and misrepresentations about quality or geographical origin for agri-food products that have a strong traditional or cultural connection to a particular geographical area. The UK will establish its own GI scheme consistent with (and going beyond) the provisions of the WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPS). The new scheme is to provide a clear and simple set of rules on GIs and continuous protection in the UK for UK GIs notwithstanding exit from the EU. The scheme will be open to new applications from both UK and non-UK applicants.

For further analysis of the impact of Brexit on IP rights and how to moderate this, see the IP section of the HSF Brexit Legal Guide in the Brexit hub of our website (https://www.herbertsmithfreehills.com/latest-thinking/hubs/brexit).

Authors

Mark Shillito
Mark Shillito
Partner
+44 20 7466 2031
Laura Deacon
Laura Deacon
Of Counsel
+44 20 7466 2045
Peter FitzPatrick
Peter FitzPatrick
Associate
+44 20 7466 3711

The UK ratifies the Unified Patent Court Agreement on World IP Day

The UK has ratified the UPC Agreement today, 26 April 2018, which also happens to be World IP Day.

The UK IP Minister announced the ratification at a World IP Day event at the House of Commons this afternoon. It seems that the UK Government has listened to the many representative groups in the Patent arena who suggested that being part of the new system prior to Brexit was preferable to trying to join it post-Brexit.  Now we need to wait to see if the German constitutional challenges can be resolved before the end of March next year.

The UK, along with France and Germany, is one of three signatory states which must ratify before the Agreement can come into force. France ratified long ago (2014), so German ratification is all that is now needed. Ratification by Germany has been held up by challenges to the legislation which was passed to allow Germany to ratify in both the Bundestag and the German Constitutional Court. Neither has yet been resolved.

15 other countries have already ratified the UPC Agreement. Once Germany ratifies, the Agreement will come into force on the first day of the fourth month after the month of that last required ratification. Assuming the constitutional challenges fail, German ratification will likely be timed to coordinate with the new Unitary Patent Court being ready to operate. Once in effect, the UPC court will operate across all current EU states except Croatia, Poland and Spain which have not signed up to the Agreement. A European patent with unitary effect (otherwise known as a unitary patent) will be available, covering all the participating states, once the UPC is established. Unitary patents will be enforced through the UPC which will also have jurisdiction over European patents which have not been opted out of the new system.

For more on the UPC Agreement including the other states which have ratified already see the UPC Agreement section of our UPC hub (www.hsf.com/upc).

Authors

Rachel Montagnon
Rachel Montagnon
Professional Support Consultant, London
+44 20 7466 2217

 

THE UNIFIED PATENT COURT (UPC) – OPEN FOR BUSINESS IN 2018?

At the start of 2017 the expectation was that the UPC Agreement would achieve the required ratification levels and that the UK could well ratify in advance of Brexit in order to become a full participant, even given the question marks that arose about the ability of a non-EU jurisdiction to be part of the new unitary and European patent enforcement system. Now, at the start of 2018, things are still uncertain.

Despite the IP Minister’s announcement in November 2016 that the UK would ratify, no ratification was forthcoming, although the UK has drawn closer to ratification as a result of the International Organisations (Immunities and Privileges) (Scotland) Amendment (No 2) Order 2017 being approved by the Scottish Parliament on 25 October 2017. This order will confer certain privileges and immunities on the UPC and its judges and other staff. The equivalent statutory instrument, the Unified Patents Court (Immunities and Privileges Order) 2017 was laid before the House of Commons on 26 June 2017 and following approval by both chambers of the Westminster parliament (including the House of Lords in December 2017), it is waiting approval by the Privy Council, along with the Scottish order. Representative bodies of IP practitioners joined together shortly before Christmas 2017 to send a note to the Government on the key areas that need addressing prior to Brexit, including ratification of the UPC Agreement (see our post on this here).

Elsewhere in the EU three more states ratified the UPCA in 2017: Italy, Estonia and Lithuania, and Latvia on 11 January 2018. This brings the total number of ratifying states to 15 more than the 13 required, but still missing two of the mandatory ratification states other than France: Germany and the UK (while it is still in the EU).

However, with France ratifying the Protocol on Privileges and Immunities at the end of December 2017 and Belgium adopting legislation in December to implement the UPC, the EU looks poised to commence the new court system as soon as possible once the UK leaves the EU. This will be possible only once Germany has ratified. Italy will take the place of the UK as the third mandatory ratifier after France and Germany, and has already ratified as mentioned above. Continue reading

PATENT AND PHARMA UPDATE – November 2017

Key recent developments in the United Kingdom and Europe relating to the patents and pharmaceutical sector. One of the most significant developments in the patent law arena in recent years has been the decision of the Supreme Court in Actavis v Eli Lilly, which has changed the approach to patent infringement in the UK. The update starts by commenting on the new rules of infringement and looks at how subsequent decisions may apply this new test. The case will impact most pharmaceutical sector players, whether they are originators or generics, and may impact the strategy that patentees adopt when litigating in the UK. The update further reports on other significant developments in UK and European law, including a recent TBA decision which elevates the threshold for plausibility and recent references to the CJEU on the SPC Regulation.

1. A new UK approach to infringement: equivalents infringe a patent, but do not anticipate it?

The UK Supreme Court has redefined the UK approach to patent infringement, holding that the scope of protection of a patent extends to “equivalents” of the claimed invention. However, the Patents Court has since held that such equivalents, even if they pre-date the patent, do not anticipate it Read more


2. Plausibility before the EPO and reliance on post-published evidence

BMS has filed a petition for review to the Enlarged Board of Appeal regarding the TBA’s decision to revoke BMS’s patent for the anti-cancer drug dasatinib. The Board’s decision to revoke the patent suggests that the threshold for plausibility has been elevated, at least in the context of an inventive step Read more


3. Further References to the CJEU on Supplementary Protection Certificates (“SPCs”)

The German Federal Patent Court has referred two further issues to the CJEU regarding the interpretation of Article 2 and 3(a) of the SPC Regulation. In relation to Article 2 the Court has asked whether an SPC can be obtained for drug device combination products and, if so, in what circumstances. With regards to Article 3(a) the Court has added further detail to the questions asked by Arnold J in Teva v Gilead Read more


4. New Unjustified Threats Regime in force from 1 October 2017 – encompassing unitary patents and European patents under UPC jurisdiction

The new Unjustified Threats Regime has recently come into force. This Regime is an attempt to encourage more pre-action communication by providing greater clarity on what amounts to an actionable threat Read more


5. Further information ordered to be provided in an enquiry as to damages under a cross-undertaking

Birss J has provided guidance on pleadings for damages under a cross-undertaking. The High Court found the Points of Claim were fundamentally lacking critical information and Sandoz was ordered to provide further information on their substantial £100 million claim for damages, including profit margins on each type of product and profit flows between the relevant Sandoz group companies (under agreed confidentiality terms) Read more


6. UK court strikes out a claim for loss suffered as a result of the tort of unlawful deceit

The High Court has struck out the NHS’s claim for damages based on the tort of causing loss by unlawful means regarding misrepresentations on novelty/obviousness. Roth J’s interim decision represents the latest instalment in the fall-out from Servier’s actions concerning delayed entry of perindopril, and suggests that this tort should be confined within a narrow ambit Read more


7. Judicial consideration of a collaboration agreement in Astex Therapeutics Limited v AstraZeneca AB [2017] EWHC 1442 (Ch), (“Astex”)

Arnold J’s judgment in Astex provides insight into how the Courts will approach the interpretation of a research and collaboration agreement. Arnold J also commented on the amount of witness evidence that was put before him concerning events that had occurred between 10 to 15 years ago Read more


8. Developments in Europe

A brief overview of the developments in the European arena in the past months, including an EU Commission consultation on SPCs, the new approach adopted by EPO to patentability of products obtained by essentially biological processes and how HSF can help you to successfully navigate the new data protection laws Read more


9. UPC Update

This article provides an update on the progress of ratification of the UPCA in the UK and Germany Read more

 

See our previous Patent and Pharma Updates on our IP Blog here:

Patent and Pharma Update – June 2017

Patent and Pharma Update – January 2017

Patent and Pharma Update – May 2016

 

Authors

Sophie Rich
Sophie Rich
Partner
+44 20 7466 2294
Jonathan Turnbull
Jonathan Turnbull
Senior Associate
+44 20 7466 2174
Monika Klajn
Monika Klajn
Associate
+44 20 7466 7604
Rachel Montagnon
Rachel Montagnon
Professional Support Consultant
+44 20 7466 2217

UPC commencement postponed – Preparatory Committee announces that 1 December 2017 start date cannot be maintained

Latest UPC developments:

  • UPC Preparatory Committee announces that 1 December 2017 start date for UPC has been postponed (7 June 2017)
  • Private challenge to the UPC system made before German Constitutional Court delays progress of Gernan UPCA ratification
  • UPC Protocol on Provisional Application requires further ratification before practical arrangements can begin to be made for the UPC
  • Meeting of EU Competitiveness Council acknowledges delays in ratification (May)
  • Final draft of UPC Rules approved by UPC Preparatory Committee (April)

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