Affordable Housing Back to Basics: What do the new NPPF and Draft London Plan modifications mean for affordable housing?

This blog post explores how the meaning of affordable housing has evolved following the publication of the revised National Planning Policy Framework (“NPPF”) on 24 July 2018 and the Draft New London Plan showing Minor Suggested Changes on 13 August 2018. This is part of our ‘back to basics’ affordable housing series and is intended to supersede entry 1 in the series. Continue reading

Revised National Planning Policy Framework—will it fix the housing market?

This article was first published on Lexis®PSL Planning on 9 August 2018.

Will the government’s new planning rulebook deliver on its promises? Robert Walton, barrister at Landmark Chambers, says the new National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) is a step in the right direction and should result in more houses. Matthew White, partner and head of the planning team in Herbert Smith Freehills LLP’s London office, predicts that, by itself, the revised NPPF will not streamline the planning process, nor close the gap between planning permissions and housing delivery. Continue reading

Impact of revised National Planning Policy Framework

The revised National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) was published on 24 July 2018. This post considers what difference it will make – in terms of the impact on developers, whether the government’s aims will be achieved and how soon its effects might be seen.

Impact on developers

On the whole, policies in the revised NPPF are more restrictive. Tighter controls over design standards, green belt boundaries, developer contributions and viability appraisals, stronger protection for the environment and the introduction of the “agent of change” principle to new development all provide little incentive to bring forward development.

A welcome change, however, is that LPAs should now take a more flexible approach to daylight and sunlight issues.

The new standardised methodology for calculating housing need, which takes effect immediately, represents a significant change for residential development. It will provide more certainty on housing requirements in each LPA’s area, generally with an increase in housing targets. Local authorities’ success in delivering against these targets will be assessed by the new Housing Delivery Test. From November 2018 local plans will be deemed out of date if the LPA fails to deliver 25% of its housing target as assessed by the new standardised methodology; this threshold will increase in subsequent years to 45% of the target from November 2019 and 75% of the target from November 2020. If local plans are deemed out of date the presumption in favour of sustainable development will be brought into play, increasing the likelihood that planning permission will be granted. Continue reading

Affordable housing viability calculations: Herbert Smith Freehills workshops on Mayor’s new guidance

Herbert Smith Freehills are running workshops for property developers on housing and viability, with a focus on London and interpreting the Mayor’s recently adopted guidance on viability and affordable housing.  In our workshops we run through a case study with actual calculations showing how viability reviews work under the Mayor’s new formulae. Please contact us for more information on the workshops.

Background: proposals on a national and London-wide scale to address the housing crisis

Following the Government’s Housing White Paper (in February 2017), several recent publications by the Government and the Mayor of London set out proposed changes to planning legislation and policy, designed to address the housing crisis:

– The Mayor of London adopted his Affordable Housing and Viability Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) in August 2017. This SPG aims to improve transparency and trust in the planning process, with a focus on viability information, and aims to increase the expectation of actual delivery of affordable housing to at least 35% (and 50% on public land) for each new development scheme which proposes 10 or more new homes, with an overall long-term strategic aim of at least half of all new homes in London being affordable.  The method and explanations in the Mayor’s SPG are more detailed and rigorous than those in the Government’s national consultation (see below), and there have been industry calls for the Mayor’s methodology to be used nation-wide. Continue reading

Communal living – flexible renting within a rigid planning system

Co-living is perhaps a concept traditionally associated with the shoestring lifestyle of students. But what about curated workspaces, well-equipped gyms or perhaps even a trip to the spa – all under the same roof?  New flexible living models have already started to spawn across London.  In this post, we look at how law and policy are playing catch up as these new products challenge traditional methods of defining land use.

The capital’s leading developers are taking notice of co-living. There is an unwavering desire amongst the world’s transient young population to work in London. However, traditional home ownership aspirations have been replaced by a realism around the cost of buying property in London. The market for new rental products, focussing on access to luxury facilities and large social networks, carries an obvious attraction.

So what happens when co-living models don’t fit within an existing land use category – where a property may be occupied by different types of users, some for only one night and others for perhaps several years? How should these applications be treated by the planning authority, particularly where they address an identified need?

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Brexit: some indirect implications for development and planning

Author: Matthew White, Partner and Head of Planning, Real Estate, London

There are many briefings on what Brexit means for real estate and I don't intend to repeat them in this blog entry. There are only so many ways of saying that the outlook remains uncertain and some transactions are likely to be put on hold until the situation becomes clearer.

Instead, I want to consider some of the indirect implications of last Thursday's vote. I have spent the last week talking to clients and contacts about their concerns, many of which are less obvious than the headlines would suggest. It would be unfair to identify whom I have spoken to, but equally I cannot claim all the credit for these thoughts either.

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How to solve a housing crisis: commercial viability, land value and affordable housing

Author: Martyn Jarvis, Associate, Planning, Real Estate, London

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The UK is facing a housing crisis, most pronounced in London, and this is set to be a key factor in the forthcoming Mayoral elections.  Meanwhile, commercial viability is the talk of the town.  How “viable” a scheme is will influence how much affordable housing can be provided.   Requiring disclosure of viability information across London, standardising land value calculations, standardising viability methodology and fixing affordable housing targets are amongst recent recommendations made to the Government and to the Mayor.

Transparent viability information is already required in Islington, and with Greenwich and Southwark following suit where schemes are not policy compliant, the London Assembly are now urging the Mayor to adopt this approach across London.  Over the past few weeks the London Assembly Planning Committee and London First have both presented papers aimed at steering a policy shift once the new Mayor takes office.

 

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