MCIL2 update – in force 1 April 2019

Last week, we published a post (see here) noting that the Mayoral Community Infrastructure Levy 2 (‘MCIL2’) was due to come into force on 1 April 2019, setting out details of the new charges, which developments would be affected and the implications for developers. By a letter dated 28 February 2019, the Greater London Authority (‘GLA’) has now confirmed that the Mayor of London has formally adopted the MCIL2 Charging Schedule and that it will indeed be brought into effect on 1 April. Two modifications have been made to the final version of the Charging Schedule, the most important of which is that the Elephant and Castle Opportunity Area is not part of the Central London Charging Area for office, retail and hotel development; the second modification clarifies the definitions of hotel, office and retail uses. The GLA has also confirmed that MCIL2 will be used to fund both Crossrail 1 (the Elizabeth Line) and Crossrail 2, and that the MCIL2 Charging Schedule will supersede both the 2012 Mayoral CIL Charging Schedule (‘MCIL1’) and the 2016 Section 106 Crossrail Funding from Planning Obligations Supplementary Planning Guidance (referred to in our previous post as the ‘s106 Crossrail Charge’). Continue reading

In force soon – Mayoral Community Infrastructure Levy 2 (MCIL2)

The Mayoral Community Infrastructure Levy 2, or ‘MCIL2’, is a new charging schedule for the Mayor’s Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) charge. It sets new (higher) rates for Mayoral CIL and is due to take effect on 1 April 2019. (It is technically possible that the Mayor may change his mind about MCIL2 before 1 April 2019, but it should be assumed that he will not.)

This post explains what MCIL2 is, what it means for developments in London and what action developers may wish to take before MCIL2 comes into force.

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Affordable Housing Back to Basics: What do the new NPPF and Draft London Plan modifications mean for affordable housing?

This blog post explores how the meaning of affordable housing has evolved following the publication of the revised National Planning Policy Framework (“NPPF”) on 24 July 2018 and the Draft New London Plan showing Minor Suggested Changes on 13 August 2018. This is part of our ‘back to basics’ affordable housing series and is intended to supersede entry 1 in the series. Continue reading

Revised National Planning Policy Framework—will it fix the housing market?

This article was first published on Lexis®PSL Planning on 9 August 2018.

Will the government’s new planning rulebook deliver on its promises? Robert Walton, barrister at Landmark Chambers, says the new National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) is a step in the right direction and should result in more houses. Matthew White, partner and head of the planning team in Herbert Smith Freehills LLP’s London office, predicts that, by itself, the revised NPPF will not streamline the planning process, nor close the gap between planning permissions and housing delivery. Continue reading

Impact of revised National Planning Policy Framework

The revised National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) was published on 24 July 2018. This post considers what difference it will make – in terms of the impact on developers, whether the government’s aims will be achieved and how soon its effects might be seen.

Impact on developers

On the whole, policies in the revised NPPF are more restrictive. Tighter controls over design standards, green belt boundaries, developer contributions and viability appraisals, stronger protection for the environment and the introduction of the “agent of change” principle to new development all provide little incentive to bring forward development.

A welcome change, however, is that LPAs should now take a more flexible approach to daylight and sunlight issues.

The new standardised methodology for calculating housing need, which takes effect immediately, represents a significant change for residential development. It will provide more certainty on housing requirements in each LPA’s area, generally with an increase in housing targets. Local authorities’ success in delivering against these targets will be assessed by the new Housing Delivery Test. From November 2018 local plans will be deemed out of date if the LPA fails to deliver 25% of its housing target as assessed by the new standardised methodology; this threshold will increase in subsequent years to 45% of the target from November 2019 and 75% of the target from November 2020. If local plans are deemed out of date the presumption in favour of sustainable development will be brought into play, increasing the likelihood that planning permission will be granted. Continue reading

EGi: What’s so unlawful about London’s affordable housing policy?

The High Court has declared a key policy in the mayor of London’s planning guidance on affordable housing ‘unlawful’ – but what does that mean in practice? Matthew White, Partner and Head of UK planning, explains the impact of the decision in this article published on EGi on 25 June 2018, in hard copy in Estates Gazette on 30 June 2018.

For more information please contact:

Matthew White
Matthew White
Partner and Head of UK planning practice, London
+44 20 7466 2461

 

Affordable housing viability calculations: Herbert Smith Freehills workshops on Mayor’s new guidance

Herbert Smith Freehills are running workshops for property developers on housing and viability, with a focus on London and interpreting the Mayor’s recently adopted guidance on viability and affordable housing.  In our workshops we run through a case study with actual calculations showing how viability reviews work under the Mayor’s new formulae. Please contact us for more information on the workshops.

Background: proposals on a national and London-wide scale to address the housing crisis

Following the Government’s Housing White Paper (in February 2017), several recent publications by the Government and the Mayor of London set out proposed changes to planning legislation and policy, designed to address the housing crisis:

– The Mayor of London adopted his Affordable Housing and Viability Supplementary Planning Guidance (SPG) in August 2017. This SPG aims to improve transparency and trust in the planning process, with a focus on viability information, and aims to increase the expectation of actual delivery of affordable housing to at least 35% (and 50% on public land) for each new development scheme which proposes 10 or more new homes, with an overall long-term strategic aim of at least half of all new homes in London being affordable.  The method and explanations in the Mayor’s SPG are more detailed and rigorous than those in the Government’s national consultation (see below), and there have been industry calls for the Mayor’s methodology to be used nation-wide. Continue reading

Communal living – flexible renting within a rigid planning system

Co-living is perhaps a concept traditionally associated with the shoestring lifestyle of students. But what about curated workspaces, well-equipped gyms or perhaps even a trip to the spa – all under the same roof?  New flexible living models have already started to spawn across London.  In this post, we look at how law and policy are playing catch up as these new products challenge traditional methods of defining land use.

The capital’s leading developers are taking notice of co-living. There is an unwavering desire amongst the world’s transient young population to work in London. However, traditional home ownership aspirations have been replaced by a realism around the cost of buying property in London. The market for new rental products, focussing on access to luxury facilities and large social networks, carries an obvious attraction.

So what happens when co-living models don’t fit within an existing land use category – where a property may be occupied by different types of users, some for only one night and others for perhaps several years? How should these applications be treated by the planning authority, particularly where they address an identified need?

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Comfort and joy

Author: Alex Rhodes, Senior Associate, Planning, London

While this may feel like yet another winter with warmer than usual temperatures, the harsh reality is that not everyone will be celebrating the season of goodwill with a roof over their heads. It's an issue bothering local and central government alike. We're still waiting for the government's Housing White Paper, now due to be published in January. However, the Mayor of London published his draft SPG on affordable housing and viability on 29 November, and this has been followed by a government consultation on a new housing costs model for supported housing, "Ensuring new supply of supported housing", concerning housing for the most vulnerable people such as those with learning difficulties, older people with support needs, young people leaving care, and crisis and emergency accommodation.

The government is expressly seeking the views of developers on its supported housing costs model, the consultation for which runs until 13 February 2017, and the Mayor's draft SPG consultation closes on 28 February. Wouldn't it be good if progress can be made on closing the housing gap; perhaps these consultations may result in some comfort and joy for affordable and supported housing occupiers.

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Air quality update

Authors: Julie Vaughan, Senior Associate, Environment and Helena Thompson, Associate, Planning and Environment, London

This blog gives an overview of the current position on air quality following the recent ClientEarth (No.2) court decision regarding DEFRA's air quality plan. In this blog we will consider:

  1. the ClientEarth (No.2) decision
  2. Sadiq Khan's approach
  3. new domestic legislation?
  4. impact on Heathrow expansion
  5. impact on development
  6. Brexit

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